Why does Bertie's still get kid gloves?

bertie.jpg

Another moment of national embarrassment

An observation.

While Bock finally gets to say 'good riddance' to our beloved leader (and gets lambasted in the comments), the Irish print media turn all sentimental and gooey.

A quick glance at the front page headlines of today's papers reveals the level of affection our professional journalists (or sub-eds at least) still reserve for this chancer and the *ahem* 'Sterling' work he has done.

Here they are, with my reading of their tone.

Irish Independent: GOODBYE BERTIE (sober, little tear in the eye)

Irish Sun: I'LL SEE YIZ LADS (jaunty, good times)

Irish Mirror: IT'S ALL YOURS BRIAN (strong, loyal pals)

Irish Examiner: I'LL SUBMIT TO THE VERDICT OF HISTORY (facts=opinions, for statesman-like Bertie)

Irish Times: TAOISEACH CALLS TIME AND ANNOUNCES MAY 6 DEPARTURE (non-judgemental)

Evening Herald: BERTIE FOR PRESIDENT (nailing colours to the mast)

How do these compare with, and contrast to, the British papers?

Daily Telegraph: AHERN FORCED TO RESIGN OVER SLEAZE ALLEGATIONS

The Times: AHERN QUITS AMID STORM OVER CASH

The Independent: SCANDAL FORCES AHERN TO STEP DOWN

Or the international headlines? With uncharacteristic contextualisation, they all seem to know that this is happening 'amid' something.

New York Times: IRELAND'S PRIME MINISTER TO RESIGN AMID CORRUPTION INQUIRY

Washington Post: IRELAND'S PRIME MINISTER TO STEP DOWN AMID OFFICIAL PROBE OF PERSONAL FINANCES

Boston Globe: IRISH PRIME MINISTER AHERN RESIGNING AMID FINANCE PROBE

I don't know about you, but I find it embarrassing to see 'Irish Prime Minister' in the same sentence with words like 'corruption' and 'scandal.' What, are we Italy now? If he had stepped down ages ago the headlines might have read more blandly 'Irish ex-politician.'

As usual, our papers' reflect the public attitude, which seems to be 'Good man for getting away with it for so long.'

Bah. Good riddance.

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